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Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery
SNAP-T: Strengths, Needs, Attitudes, Preferences & Temperament
Presented by: Dr. Dawn-Elise Snipes  Executive Director, AllCEUs
Podcast Host: Counselor Toolbox & Happiness isn’t Brain Surgery
Author: Journey to Recovery (2015) & Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery (2017)
Objectives
~    Explore the concept of SNAP-T
~    Review the different learning styles
~    Explore how strengths and needs and attitudes impact your success in change.
SNAP
~    Strengths
~    Needs (Accommodations)
~    Attitudes
~    Preferences (learning style, temperament)

Strengths
~    You are good at… (transferability)
~    How you…
~    Learn best
~    Have coped in the past
~    What gives you hope
~    What you already know about
~    The condition
~    Recovery methods
~    What does and does not work for you
Needs
~    Emotional
~    Happiness
~    Contentment/Efficacy
~    Mental/Cognitive
~    Learning preferences
~    Learning needs to understand the condition and interventions
~    Physical
~    Assistive devices
~    Frequent breaks
~    Medications
Needs
~    Social
~    Friendships
~    Understanding of healthy relationships
~    Environmental
~    Safety
~    Temperature
~    Comfort
~    Time of Day
~    Transportation
~    Child Care
Learning Styles Review
~    How you best take in information
~    Auditory
~    Kinesthetic
~    Visual
~    How you process information
~    Active
~    Reflective
~    Conceptualization
~    Sequential
~    Global

Attitudes
~    Self
~    Others
~    The Condition/Target Issue
~    Willingness to learn and try new things
~    Interventions/Recovery
I will not call myself an addict every day
I will not go to “those meetings”
Everybody relapses
I have to have Suboxone to achieve recovery
I will never get better
Medications don’t work
Decisional Balance
Summary
~    Part of making treatment/change work for you, it is important to understand how you learn, what your strengths are, why you are motivated to change and why you are NOT motivated to change.
~    The next part is understanding your in-born preferences to create a comfortable environment, learn how to get information in a way that is meaningful, understand what motivates you and explore how to best work within your time management style.

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Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery
SNAP-T: Strengths, Needs, Attitudes, Preferences & Temperament
Presented by: Dr. Dawn-Elise Snipes  Executive Director, AllCEUs
Podcast Host: Counselor Toolbox & Happiness isn’t Brain Surgery
Author: Journey to Recovery (2015) & Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery (2017)
Objectives
~    Review how temperament impacts every aspect of your life.
~    Explore how knowing your temperament and that of other people can help you reduce your stress
Preferences
~    Your temperament impacts your Strengths, Needs, Attitudes and Preferences
~    Temperament is:
~    Comprised of 4 dimensions
~    Environment and Energy
~    Mental Conceptualization
~    Motivation and Meaning
~    Time Management and Structure
~    An overarching concept that is on a continuum.
~    One end of the continuum is not better than the other, it is just different.
~    Most people are somewhere in the middle, having characteristics of both “ends”

Temperament
Extrovert
~    Are expansive; less passionate
~    Easy to get to know
~    Like meeting new people
~    Would rather figure things out while they are talking
~    Often enjoy background noise
~    Know what is going on around them rather than inside them
~    Often do not mind interruptions
~    Are often considered good talkers

Introvert
~    Are intense and passionate
~    Difficult to get to know
~    Exert effort to meet new people
~    Figure things out before they talk
~    Prefer peace and quiet
~    Are more likely to know what is going on inside them
~    Dislike being interrupted
~    Are often good listeners

Quick Questions
~    Does the person prefer to think then talk (Introvert) or talk while they are thinking (Extravert)
~    Does the person prefer quiet and hate interruptions (Introvert) or love being around others and prefer activity (Extravert)
~    Does the person enjoy larger groups (Extravert) or prefer smaller groups of 2-8 (Introvert)
~    Is the person a better listener (Introvert) or talker (Extravert)
Summary
~    Extrovert and Introvert are terms used to generally describe
~    The types of social interactions they prefer
~    The types of environments they prefer
~    Where they derive their energy
~    Their problem solving process
~    Extroverts may have many friends, enjoy large groups and energized situations, be able to handle interruptions, and think while they speak
~    Introverts have a few close friends, prefer smaller focused groups in quiet environments with few interruptions and prefer to think THEN speak
Summary
~    Extroverts and Introverts Together
~    Extroverts
~    Often NEED
~    Social interaction, not for validation, but for stimulation and recharging.  (Meetings, recovery retreats, volunteer activities)
~    Someone to “bounce thoughts off of” who is a good listener and understanding
~    Are more aware of what is going on with those around them and often pick up on relapse warning signs in others.
Summary
~    Extroverts and Introverts Together
~    Introverts
~    May choose to encourage the extrovert to engage in social activities independently.
~    May need to address abandonment and self-esteem issues when in a relationship with an Extrovert
~    May be less aware of how their presence impacts others which can be a hurdle in relationships.
Summary
~    Extroverts and Introverts in Recovery
~    Extroverts often thrive in support group meetings, draw energy from being around others in recovery and need the stimulation of discussing recovery and life in general.
~    Extroverts may notice someone else’s relapse warning signs, but miss their own (Mindfulness, Active reflection)
~    Extroverts need to understand: How their introvert partner gets grounded, and what their recovery program looks like.
~    Introverts often prefer small groups like big book or bible studies, need quiet time to get grounded and focused and prefer to ponder recovery and life independently then discuss it. (Workbooks and journals are good here)
~    Introverts may notice relapse warning signs, but not feel comfortable in traditional recovery environments
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Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery
SNAP-T: Strengths, Needs, Attitudes, Preferences & Temperament
Presented by: Dr. Dawn-Elise Snipes  Executive Director, AllCEUs
Podcast Host: Counselor Toolbox & Happiness isn’t Brain Surgery
Author: Journey to Recovery (2015) & Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery (2017)
Temperament
Sensing
~    Are practical and realistic
~    Prefer facts and live in the real world
~    Content in general
~    Would rather do than think
~    Focus on practical, concrete problems
~    See the details and may ignore the big picture
~    Want specifics and tend to be very literal
~    May think that those preferring intuition are impractical
~    Believe “if it isn’t broken, don’t fix it”
iNtuitive
~    Are imaginative dreamers
~    Prefer abstraction, inspiration, insights
~    Live in the world of possibilities
~    Would rather think than do
~    Focus on complicated abstract problems
~    See the big picture but miss the details
~    Love word games
~    May think that those preferring the practical lack vision
~    Believe anything can be improved
~    Focus on the future and possibilities

Quick Questions
~    Does the person prefer facts and details (Sensing) or broad concepts and ideas (iNtuitive)
~    Does the person prefer to start with the big picture and work down to the details (iNtuitive) or prefer to start with the details and see where it leads (Sensing)
~    Does the person believe everything can be improved (iNtuitive) or if it aint broke, don’t fix it (Sensing)
Summary
~    Sensing and iNtuitive refers to how people view the world, tasks and problems
~    Sensing people love facts and details and believe if it aint broke, don’t fix it.  They are excellent at holding the reins so to speak, but they can get so caught up in the details they miss the big picture.
~    iNtuitive people are dreamers and think in terms of meta-concepts and the big picture, often missing the details and having difficulty being content with what is, always seeing ways to improve things.
Summary
~    In recovery
~    Sensors can get too caught up with completing plan tasks and miss the big picture of what recovery is supposed to be. “By doing what I am doing, how is that helping me achieve my goals and draw closer to who and what is important to me?”
~    iNtuitors can get caught thinking in the future and lack of mindfulness of the present can derail recovery efforts.  “What do I need right now to keep moving toward the things and people that are important to me.”
Summary
~    Sensors and iNtuitors Together
~    Sensors can use iNtuitors’ vision to maintain an optimistic outloos
~    iNtuitors can use Sensors’ groundedness to remain mindful and remember to not follow every wild hare.
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Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery
SNAP-T: Strengths, Needs, Attitudes, Preferences & Temperament
Presented by: Dr. Dawn-Elise Snipes  Executive Director, AllCEUs
Podcast Host: Counselor Toolbox & Happiness isn’t Brain Surgery
Author: Journey to Recovery (2015) & Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery (2017)
Temperament
Thinking
~    Like words such as principles, justice, standards or analysis
~    Respond most easily to people’s thoughts
~    Want to apply objective principles
~    Value objectivity above sentiment
~    Can assess logical consequences
~    Believe it is more important to be just than merciful
~    Assess reality with a true/false lens
~    May think that those who are sentimental take things too personally
~    May argue both sides of an issue for mental stimulation

Feeling
~    Like words such as care, compassion, mercy, intimacy, harmony, devotion
~    Respond most easily to people’s values
~    Want to apply values and ethics from multiple perspectives
~    Value sentiment above objectivity
~    Good at assessing the human impact
~    Believe it is more important to be caring/merciful
~    Assess reality with a good/bad lens
~    Think that those preferring objectivity are insensitive
~    Prefer a to agree with those around them

Quick Questions
~    Does the person prefer words like logic, fairness and analysis (Thinking) or  compassion, intimacy (Feeling)
~    Does the person make decisions through a true/false lens (Thinking) or a good/bad lens (Feeling)
~    Does the person seem more objective (Thinking) or sentimental (Feeling)
Summary
~    Both Thinkers and Feelers have an emotional, rational and wise mind
~    Thinkers prefer facts and logic, justice and rules— This is how it is done.
~    Feelers prefer compassion and connectedness. ––It should be done this way because it is the most compassionate.
~    In relationships, Thinkers must be willing to appreciate compassion and connectedness and Feelers must be willing to look at the logic, and compromise to reach the “best” decision
Summary
~    Thinkers and Feelers in Recovery
~    Thinkers tend to go by the book and struggle immensely with those who are more flexible.
~    Feelers tend to want everyone to succeed and are very giving of themselves, at their own expense.
~    Thinkers can help them find the compromise between compassion and self sacrifice.
~    Feelers can help Thinkers look outside the box and embrace some of the benefits of connectedness
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Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery
SNAP-T: Strengths, Needs, Attitudes, Preferences & Temperament
Presented by: Dr. Dawn-Elise Snipes  Executive Director, AllCEUs
Podcast Host: Counselor Toolbox & Happiness isn’t Brain Surgery
Author: Journey to Recovery (2015) & Happiness Isn’t Brain Surgery (2017)
Temperament
Judging
~    Plan ahead
~    Self disciplined and purposeful
~    Thrive on order
~    Get things done early. Plan ahead & work steadily.
~    Define and work within limits
~    Maybe hasty in making decisions
~    Time and deadline oriented
~    Thinks those preferring spontaneity are too unpredictable
~    Excellent planners. May not appreciate or make use of things which are not planned or expected
Perceiving
~    Adapt as they go
~    Flexible and tolerant
~    Thrive on spontaneity
~    Get things done at the last minute depending on spurt of energy
~    Want more information
~    May fail to make decisions
~    Always think there’s plenty of time
~    Think that those who are not spontaneous are too rigid
~    Good at handling unplanned events, but may not make affective choices among the possibilities.

Quick Questions
~    Does the person love schedules (Judging) or prefer spontaneity (Perceiving)
~    Does the person get tasks done early (Judging) or at the last minute (Perceiving)
~    Does the person fail to make use of all possibilities and struggle with unplanned events (Judging) or make good use of all possibilities and handle unplanned events well?

Summary
~    Judgers and Perceivers Together
~    Judgers need
~    To allow for some spontaneity
~    To have coping skills to deal with plan changes
~    To appreciate the Perceiver’s desire to explore and set schedule guidelines
~    Perceivers need
~    To plan spontaneity
~    To have a general schedule, most of the time
~    To be willing to stop researching and make a decision or get started

Summary
~    Judgers and Perceivers in Recovery
~    Judgers
~    Need a backup plan for when their recovery activities fall through
~    Can benefit from being willing to explore possibilities and “re-open” their recovery plan
~    Are excellent at helping Perceivers create relapse prevention plans
~    Perceivers
~    Need a plan (daily or weekly lists can work)
~    Can benefit from Judger’s insistence on getting started
~    Are excellent at helping Judgers handle unplanned events

Summary
~    Changing behavior involves learning what is causing your distress and tools to manage it.
~    Effective change involves
~    Maximizing your strengths
~    Consider your needs and motivations
~    Address your attitudes
~    Work in harmony with your own preferences and the preferences of those around you.
~    It is important to pay attention to the potential pitfalls of your change plan based on the your SNAP-T
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